A passion for change

Improving environmental performance at the Taranto facility, and that of Steel Plant 2 in particular, is the mission of Saverio Sandi, Environmental and Ecological Operating Controller (EEOC) in this area.

Looking through old photos we’re sometimes struck by how much we’ve changed: hair styles, dress, that bag you used nearly everyday and now wonder what happened to it. We’re the same person as in the photo, but the path we’ve come long in the meantime has also made us different. Sometimes we can’t quite remember how things went, other times we recall every single step. As a keen photographer, Saverio Sandi understands the effect that a snapshot can have a few years down the line. And maybe this is another reason why he remembers everything that’s changed at ILVA since he started work at the Taranto facility, because he’s invested, and goes on investing, such a lot in it everyday.

One of the youngest in the Group but still a witness of change

“Mental agility. To do my job it’s essential to be mentally elastic, for nothing is ever the same.” This is how Saverio sees his job and the qualities you need to be able to do it.

Adapting to change and new experience is obviously what Saverio is good at: having joined ILVA as an operative in 2011, he became the Environmental and Ecological Operating Controller for Steel Plant 2 (ACC/2) in 2015, and without abandoning his university studies.

Youthful spirit and a passion for change: born in 1989, Saverio is one of ILVA’s youngest employees.

“Compared to when I joined, everything’s changed.
Production is no longer the only objective.”

It wouldn’t be exaggerating perhaps to see him as an emblem of the Group’s new approach to production. “Compared to when I joined, everything’s changed. Production used to be the only objective, but today there are other priorities too, and the environment is one of the main ones.”

EEOC: the help that was needed

Saverio too, like the other Environmental and Ecological Operating Controllers in the various parts of the facility, is performing a role in this change.

“The professional figure was introduced in 2015, the year I started,” explains Saverio. “Our job is to characterize, certify and record the waste generated during the production cycle, each of us being responsible for a particular area.” It may sound simple but the control of emissions, verification of water parameters, supervision of waste management and drafting of reports for external certification organizations are just some of the tasks that fill the day of our EEOCs.

Every aspect of the life of a steel mill that impacts on the environment now has to be fed into and organized within a management process. 

Every aspect of the life of a steel mill that impacts on the environment now has to be fed into and organized within a management process. “In the building of this process, from all the paperwork to the actual emissions and waste control, I play my part too,” says Saverio, pride mixing with modesty.

The figures say it all, but it wasn’t easy at the start

The effects of his work can be seen everyday. “We have the figures on our side,” says Saverio. “ILVA has made considerable progress and we continue to improve. We’re now ready to build something new.”

It hasn’t all been plain sailing though, especially at the start, when there were certain difficulties, which were overcome in part thanks to the efforts of his Area Chief to explain to the others the importance of an EEOC’s work. “They didn’t understand my job at first. They’d look at me and ask “What are you? The EEOC?”

That focus on the environment has become a daily habit at ILVA Taranto is something Saverio sees everyday, also in the way that colleagues come to him for advice about their routine work. How to treat a particular sort of waste, where to take it, what the law says about managing it: these are questions that Saverio helps his colleagues find answers to.

“Everyone in this Steel Plant area has understood how important environmental issues are, and the results speak for themselves in fact.”

When Saverio looks around the Taranto facility today, he sees people who are perfectly aware of what they’re doing. “Everyone in this Steel Plant  area has understood how important environmental issues are, and the results speak for themselves in fact.”

Realizing that he played a part in this transformation gives him satisfaction and keeps him motivated and focused on always trying to do better. “This is the aspect of my job that excites me most, that gives it meaning.”

THE PERSON

Saverio Sandi was born in Taranto, where he lives and works, in 1989.

He joined ILVA in 2011, as an operative, and in 2015 became the Environmental and Ecological Operating Controller (EEOC) for Steel Plant 2 (ACC/2).
In what little time is left after work and study – he’ll soon be graduating in engineering – he’s a passionate photographer.

He likes the dynamic nature and variety of his job because they ward off fatigue.

He speaks with great enthusiasm about his work but only to those who want to listen. “With someone who doesn’t want to hear how ILVA has changed in recent years I won’t even enter the discussion. All I can do is work and demonstrate the improvements in progress with facts,” he explains.

THE PLACE

Saverio is one of the 2,100 people who work in the Steel Plant 2 area. 

As in all steel plants, at ILVA Taranto the Steel Plant is one of the most important parts of the production process. It’s here, in fact, that the molten pig iron is decarburized – by converters – before going to continuous casting and the solidification process (in special ingots).

In the last two years Steel Plant 2 has undergone major environmental operations, including the start up of work to seal the Desulphurization buildings (DES)/South and North, full covering of the belt conveyors, improvement of the ISDS system on the converters and methane enrichment for the torce.